China, Too, is Fighting to Defend a Way of Life. An Address by His Excellency, Dr. Hu Shih, Ambassador of the Republic of China to the United States of America, Delivered at Washington, D.C., March 23, 1942. Shih Hu.
China, Too, is Fighting to Defend a Way of Life. An Address by His Excellency, Dr. Hu Shih, Ambassador of the Republic of China to the United States of America, Delivered at Washington, D.C., March 23, 1942

China, Too, is Fighting to Defend a Way of Life. An Address by His Excellency, Dr. Hu Shih, Ambassador of the Republic of China to the United States of America, Delivered at Washington, D.C., March 23, 1942

San Francisco: The Grabhorn Press, 1942. First Edition. Hardcover. Folio; [4], 18, [1]pp. A Near Fine copy in publisher's gold paper covered boards, lettered in red and black on front cover. 'Of this significant contribution to a better understanding of events now transpiring in the Far East two hundred copies have been printed at the instance of Carl I. Wheat with the generous approval of Ambassador Hu Shih. The title and signature in Chinese are from his Excellency's facile brush.' (Colophon) Grabhorn 375. Item #18623

Hu Shih (1891 – 1962) was a Chinese philosopher, essayist and diplomat. Hu is widely recognized today as a key contributor to Chinese liberalism and language reform in his advocacy for the use of written vernacular Chinese. He was influential in the May Fourth Movement, one of the leaders of China's New Culture Movement, was a president of Peking University, and in 1939 was nominated for a Nobel Prize in literature. He had a wide range of interests such as literature, history, textual criticism, and pedagogy. He was also an influential redology scholar and held the famous Jiaxu manuscript for many years until his death. His most important contribution was the promotion of vernacular Chinese in literature to replace Classical Chinese, which ideally made it easier for the ordinary person to read. Hu was the ROC ambassador to the U.S. between 1938 and 1942. Hu then served as chancellor of Peking University between 1946 and 1948. In 1957, he became the third president of the Academia Sinica in Taipei, where he remained until his death. He was also chief executive of the Free China Journal, which was eventually shut down for criticizing Chiang Kai-shek. He died of a heart attack in Nankang, Taipei at the age of 70, (Wiki).

Price: $250.00

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